Spring Clean Your Eye Health

1.Allergies

The season of spring is not only a sign that the days are getting longer and brighter but also that flowers, plants, trees and grasses begin to come alive again after the cold winter. This may look nice but if you suffer from allergies, such as hay fever, this can play real havoc with your eyes. If you use antihistamines, try to start these early in the year so when hay fever season starts you will already be protected. Also, where possible, try to avoid going outside on high pollen days, but if you have to, as soon as you get back home have a shower/bath and put on fresh clothes to avoid the pollen returning to your eyes from your body and clothes. There are many aids to help your eyes during the hay fever months, getting an appointment with your ophthalmologist to discuss your options is always recommended.

2.Sunglasses

Sunglasses should be worn all year round but many people forgot to wear them during the winter months and wait until the bright summers days to start wearing them again. Make an effort to start wearing your sunglasses earlier this year. During the spring months of March, April and May the days start to get brighter and longer but even when we get those grey days you should try to wear sunglasses when outdoors, it’s a great habit to get into. Long term sun overexposure can play a part in causing some eye problems, such as cataracts, so protecting them earlier will always be best.

3.Diet & Exercise

After the long winter months of possibly less exercise and a poor diet, spring is a perfect way to kick start healthy living again. A healthy diet and exercise is not only great for your general health but is very important to eye health. Foods high in beta-carotene, omega 3, vitamin c and e, and lutein are vital to healthy eyes. Examples of these foods are carrots, pumpkin, oily fish, berries, citrus fruit, almonds, avocados, kale, spinach, and eggs.

4.Rest & Relaxation

Resting and relaxing your eyes is very important in keeping them healthy. If you spend a lot of time looking at a computer screen for example, you could strain your eyes. A great tip is following the 20-20-20 rule; every 20 minutes’ look about 20 feet away for 20 seconds, this can really help prevent your eyes getting tired and strained from over working them. Getting good sleep is another way your eyes need to rest, about 7-8 hours for an average adult is recommended. Placing something warm over closed eye lids, such as a heated eye mask, can really aid in resting and relaxing your tired eyes in the evening, this is also great if you suffer from dry eyes and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD).

5.Eye Test

The average adult should have an eye test every 2 years and this may be more frequent if you suffer with health or eye problems. Spring is a perfect time to check if you are due for an eye test. If you are looking for a more thorough examination you can get an appointment with an ophthalmologist, their appointments tend to be more detailed and it may include having detailed eye scans (topography) carried out to enable the ophthalmologist to check all parts of your eyes more thoroughly.

Benefits Of Having Regular Visits To Your Eye Doctor

Do you know who is an optometrist? The one who has earned the Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree is known as an optometrist. The optometrist in Albuquerque examines your eyes and verifies whether you have any health problems related to eyes. If they find any refractive issues, they will prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses to correct your issue. Choosing a reliable eye care provider is an important task for everyone that could safeguard your precious sight and many more benefits. Here we have mentioned few benefits of having a regular visit to an optometrist in Albuquerque.

Early Detection of Eye Diseases

Initially, the optometrist will examine your eye vision that gives you an insight into the condition of your eyes. During the detection or testing process, your eye doctors in Albuquerque can detect the issues and provide the required treatment to treat your eye problem. So it is necessary to have a regular visit to your eye doctor to detect your eye disease in its early stage and avoid the complexity.

Detection of Health Issues

A regular visit to the optometrist can help you to identify various diseases including diabetes, high blood pressure, eyelid skin cancer, and even brain tumors.

– The patients suffering from diabetes should check their eyes since they have the chance of affected vision.

– Patients who have blood pressure may have a leaking or bent blood vessels at the back of their eyes. Visiting an eye doctor can help you to bring your blood pressure back to normal.

– Since our eyelids are very sensitive, it can be affected by ultraviolet rays and may result in various types of skin cancer. A detailed examination by an optometrist can spot the affected area and help to stop further spreading.

– Also, eye examinations can even detect brain tumors. The optic nerve will be swollen for the patients having a brain tumor, and it can be detected by the eye examination carried out by an optometrist.

Prescription Updates by Your Eye Doctor in Albuquerque

Another benefit of regular visits to an optometrist can help you undergo eye examinations and monitor your eyeglasses or contacts prescription for astigmatism, farsightedness, and nearsightedness. Most of the patients need to change or update their eyeglasses or contacts prescription with age. Ignoring or forgetting to update the eyeglasses or contacts prescription may lead to eye fatigue and create more damage to your sight. So it is recommended to visit your eye doctor at least one in every year to maintain your eyesight in good condition.

Corneal Transplants; What Are They

Penetrating Keratoplasty (PK)
This type of cornea transplant replaces the full thickness of the cornea with a healthy and clear donor tissue and is required when a cornea has been severely damaged or disease, and where no other option of surgery remains. PK can be carried out under local or general anaesthetic and takes about one to two hours to complete. During surgery, a central 8mm button of cornea is removed and a similar sized button of the donor cornea is stitched in with tiny stitches. After surgery vision will stay misty and/or cloudy for a few days and will improve gradually for about 12-18 months. Individual stitches may be removed from three months after the surgery, but complete stitch removal is not performed until at least one year after the surgery. Following surgery, and once fully healed, around 75% of transplant recipients have adequate vision to drive legally, but to get the best results from vision, glasses or contact lenses may need to be worn.

Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty (DALK)
This type of cornea transplant is a partial thickness transplant and replaces the front 99% of the cornea with a donor cornea. Unlike penetrating keratoplasty, DALK keeps the back layers of the cornea, the Descemet’s membrane and endothelium layer, in place and it is used as an alternative to PK, when these back layers of the cornea are healthy. The surgery itself is carried out much the same as PK, but just less donor cornea is used. Again, stiches are used to keep the donor tissue in place, but as only part of the cornea has been replaced, healing and visual recovery are usually quicker than what are seen with PK. To get the best vision following surgery, glasses or contact lenses may need to be worn.

Endothelial Keratoplasty (EK)
This type of cornea transplant is a partial thickness transplant and replaces only the back layers of the cornea. Unlike to above two transplants, EK can be further split into two methods; Descemet’s stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet’s membrane endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK). Both DSEK and DMEK are very similar and the procedure to carry them out is the same, but DMEK differs as the donor cornea tissue does not include any stromal layer tissue. The consultant ophthalmic surgeon will decide which surgery is necessary, depending on the damage or disease that is present. EK transplants are used when there is a problem at the back of the cornea. To help keep the cornea clear, the cells lining the inside of the cornea pump fluid to stop the cornea from swelling, if there are not enough cells, due to disease or damage, then the cornea starts to swell and vision will become cloudy. The surgery is carried out differently when compared to PK and DALK; it will again be under either local or general anaesthetic but a very small incision is made between the coloured and white part of the eye. The eye surgeon removes the dysfunctional endothelial cells through this opening and a disc of donor cells is placed back inside the eye. The donor endothelial cells are pressed to the back of the cornea with an air bubble and the patient will need to lie still for about 1 hour following surgery to make sure the air bubble stays in place. Occasionally, a few stitches to close the incision may be needed. Vision will stay misty or cloudy for a few days, and will get better over 3-4 months, as with all types of corneal transplants glasses or contact lenses may be needed after surgery to get the best results from vision